Autumn Flowers – New Designs for 2016

Autumn is officially here and to enhance or seasonal fall collection the Flowers for Everyone creative team have added fabulous new floral designs featuring popular autumn flowers.

Our ‘Oak & Amber’ range features fresh autumn blooms in burnt orange, golden yellow, peach and burgundy red with splashes of lime and accents of silver.

Long lasting lovelies such as orange vanda and red spider orchids feature alongside soft apricot roses and velvety textured blood red celosia in this divine vase arrangement pictured below. Aptly named ‘Taste of Autumn’, you can purchase these autumn flowers online designed in a hessian wrapped vase for $89 plus a flat $11.95 delivery fee in the Sydney metro.

autumn vase of flowers

Pale apricot roses, peachy carnations and golden vanda orchids are beautifully contrasted with burgundy copper beech, native red leucadendron and vivid green hypericum berries. For $69 plus delivery this fabulous fall floral concoction could be yours…

autumn flower box

We’ve named this flower arrangement ‘Fall Harvest’, inspired by its French provincial rustic-ness. Sunflowers and sculptural willow sticks are blended with golden vanda orchids and velvet celosia, offset by bright peachy pink roses and pops of fresh green. It’s great value too, for only $77.00 plus a flat $11.95 delivery fee in the Sydney metro.

sunflowers

What do we love most about this sweet little rose basket arrangement? Everything! For only $66 (plus delivery), this stylish basket features a mixture of sunset hued fresh roses with smatterings of lime green hypericum berries. Rustic, bright and oh-so-autumn, these roses are perfect for absolutely any occasion.

rose basket

If pretty-pretty is not your thing, our modern flower bouquet of juicy orange vanda orchids and burgundy coloured foliage is the answer. Starting at $65 plus delivery, these stunning orchids, autumn copper beech, willow and striped tropical cordyline leaves make a bold statement.

orchid bouquet

Earthy natives in a rustic stone pot also feature in our new range of autumn flowers. Neutral, classic and long lasting, this native flower arrangement is a beauty!

native flower arrangement

View our complete range of fresh flowers for autumn here!

Spotlight: Ikebana Master Toshiro Kawase

It’s amazing what you can discover trawling on Pinterest. Ikebana master Toshiro Kawase is one of them. Searching for beautiful pictures of ikebana floral designs, I couldn’t help but notice the name Toshiro Kawase cropping up on pins. And what stunning pins they were.

Portraits of Japan in Flowers…

Born in Kyoto in 1948, Kawase earned a degree from Nihon University College of Art. After graduating, he tripped over to Paris  to work in theatre and film, which no doubt had a major influence on his perspective and poetic style. Returning to Japan in 1974 he continued to study many forms of floral arranging, his amazing talent receiving much acclaim, and his ikebana designs being described as capturing ‘portraits of Japan in flowers’.

Toshiro Kawase ikebana

Toshiro Kawase Ikebana

Toshiro Kawase Ikebana

Toshiro Kawase Ikebana

What is Ikebana?

Ikebana is characterised by ‘extreme discipline and minimalism’. An intense study of a floral specimen to reveal its essential form. It is a balanced, contemplative, ‘meditative’ art.

As one website describes,

‘Go too far in stripping the details and the piece looses its vitality. Not far enough and the energy is obscured. To achieve such a delicate balance is the ultimate expression of humankind’s harmony with Nature, and the mark of a true master’. (1)

There are a multitude of Ikebana schools and styles that have emerged over centuries, yet Toshiro stands out as a modern day master of this ancient floral art form….

Toshiro Kawase Ikebana

Toshiro Kawase Ikebana

Toshiro Kawase Ikebana

Kawase’s work convey the delicate balance of body, mind and soul that is an integral basis to the art of ikebana. Elemental vases play an equally important role as the floral forms themselves in his compositions.

Described by art blogger www.designskool.net, Toshiro Kawase’s designs are;

‘They are like epiphanies, embodying all the tension and fragility of a state of grace. Small and yet hugely evocative, they are haikus in flowers. They are limitless energy barely contained in a halo of quiet. They are nature manipulated by man. Man in harmony with Nature.’ (2)

Toshiro Kawase Ikebana    Toshiro Kawase Ikebana

Toshiro Kawase Ikebana

To some these examples of Toshiro’s work may appear simple, easy to execute. Yet their simplicity belies the eye. A lifetime of study and intense practise has gone into these floral compositions. His work is inspired. Pure art. Take a look at more of Toshiro’s work on our Pinterest board here.

Make sure to follow our blog for further stories about the art of ikebana, and all things floral and beautiful.

[wpcb id=”38″]

References

1. http://www.gardenista.com/posts/required-reading-secrets-of-an-ikebana-master

2. http://designskool.net/toshiro-kawase/

Photo Credit

https://www.pinterest.com/ffeaus/ikebana-master-toshiro-kawase/

Styling with Waratahs

“The red flowers of the waratah how beautiful they bloom
When the wattles are in yellow and gold is on the broom
They cannot be mistaken so large and a rich red
And much about their beauty has been written and been said
When red is on the waratah and birds whistle and sing
And Nature in her green cloak wears her colours of the Spring
The naturally sweet aroma of the blossom laden trees
Come wafting through the parkland in the freshening morning breeze,
The butcherbird is piping his bubbly melody
And everywhere one turns to look great beauty one does see
And the parent birds are busy in their constant search for food
For to keep the hunger at bay in their fast growing begging brood
And when Nature is at her loveliest with a bright smile on her face
The red flowers on the waratah do take pride of place”.

“The Red Flowers of the Waratah” by Francis Duggan

It’s currently waratah season in Australia and now is the time to make the most of these native beauties during the short time they are available. Take a page out of our style file below for ideas on how to decorate your home with waratahs or incorporate into a wedding bouquet if you are a spring bride.

Styling with Waratahs

Waratahs look fabulous massed on their own in a simple vase or combined in a bouquet or flower arrangement with the likes of beautiful white oriental lilies, other natives such as native kangaroo paw, and varieties of Eucalyptus foliage and gumnuts.

waratahs in vase

waratahs in rustic tin

waratahs in vase

Their bold, sculptural stems also work really well in modern arrangements, such as this Japanese style creation using maple leave branches and fantail willow found on Home Journal.

waratahs in vase

And make for a unique, Australian-esque spring wedding bouquet. Absolutely love this design below with the lipstick pink boronia accent by a Tasmanian flower grower Swallows Nest Farm!

waratah wedding bouquet

Bunches of cut waratahs can be purchased from any one of our four retail Sydney florist stores or order a flower arrangement or bouquet to be delivered by phoning 1800 66 66 46 or emailing sales@flowersforeveryone.com.au

Blink and you’ll miss out!

Did you Know?

  1. Prior to white settlement in Australia, waratahs were reputedly placed in a bowl of water so the sweetness and life of the flower would flow into the water. This was then used to strengthen children or cure them from disease.
  2. The name waratah comes from the Eora Aboriginal people, the original inhabitants of the Sydney area.
  3. Waratahs are native to Australia and the floral emblem of New South Wales
  4. There are a number of waratah colours available including red with white tips (‘Fire ‘n Ice’); cream tinged with pink (‘Shade of Pale’); red with a pink blush (‘Brimstone Blush’); blood red (‘Shady Lady’); and almost pure white (‘Wirrimbirra White’).
  5. They waratahs are a slow plant to mature and their flowering season is short, unpredictable and unreliable, generally only lasting for about a month each year, during the spring.

Sources and Photo Credits

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s2349242.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waratah

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/ffeaus/styling-with-waratahs/

 

 

 

 

Paul Bangay Private Garden Tours 2015

Attention avid gardeners, passionate horticulturists and designers. Paul Bangay, currently regarded as Australia’s most celebrated garden designer, has released 2015 private tour dates of his personal garden Stonefields, one of the most iconic gardens in the country.

Paul has designed more than 2100 gardens around the world, including New York, St Tropez, Positano, Jamaica, New Zealand and The Cook Islands. Stonefields is his personal ‘patch of paradise’ in rural Victoria and has been his labour of love for the last eight years.

“In that time he has placed his signature style of precise clipped hedges, oak-lined driveways, symmetrical parterre plantings and carefully manicured lawns and water features on what was previously a vacant paddock of nearly 20 hectares”. (1)

Paul Bangay Stonefields Garden

Paul Bangay Stonefields

2015 PRIVATE TOURS

Paul’s exclusive tours are held in each season and include morning tea, where you have the opportunity to chat one-on-one with Paul about his garden design feats, failures, and grand successes. His most recent publication, ‘The Gardens of Stonefield’ is also available for purchase and signing on the day.

You can book either as an individual or small group, with numbers limited to 30 – 40 people to ensure a personalised experience.

The cost is $220 per person and bookings for the below dates can be made online.

Friday 13th February 2015 – 10.30am

Friday 15th May – 10.30 am

Friday 2nd October – 10.30 am

Friday 20th November – 10.30 am

IMG_1235

Paul Bangay

 

ABOUT PAUL BANGAY

Paul Bangay’s garden designs are internationally renowned for timeless elegance and classic simplicity. His extensive list of projects span private and public commissions in Australia and New Zealand, as well as further afield in Europe, North America and the West Indies. His distinctive approach has been featured in countless publications and he is a sought-after guest on gardening and lifestyle programs. Paul has published nine garden books including The Defined Garden (1996) and The Garden at Stonefields (2013).

Learn more about Paul here.

the-garden-at-stonefields-cover

STONEFIELDS ‘THE FARMHOUSE’

As an alternative (or addition to) a private garden tour, you also have the option of booking to stay at The Farm House at Stonefields, and wander Paul’s gardens at your own leisure.

Located an hour and 20 minutes North East of Melbourne, halfway between Kyneton and Daylesford, The Farm House at Stonefields is a labour of love for Paul Bangay.

The Farm House is set 100 metres from the Main House and garden at Stonefields, Paul’s country residence, and is surrounded by two large paddocks where Paul’s herd of rare breed British White cattle freely roam.

Paul Bangay

Paul Bangay Stonefields Garden

The Farm House boasts four bedrooms, two with an ensuite, a large sitting room complete with wood fire heater, open-plan kitchen and generous – yet inviting – dining room.

Chic and comfortable by design, The Farm House is surrounded by French doors, and each room looks out onto either vast swathes of flowering perennials or cascading groves of crab apples, fruit trees and the large vegetable garden.

The Farm House next to Stonefields has allowed Paul to invite guests to enjoy a walk around Stonefields iconic main garden during their stay. This once in a lifetime opportunity – for the weary traveller, garden aficionado and day-tripper alike – offers a glimpse into the magic and majesty of Paul’s design.

Rates and reservations can be found here.

Paul Bangay

Paul Bangay

[wpcb id=”16″]

Sources:

#PicturePerfectPetals Flower Photography Competition

Attention amateur photographers! We are offering a great excuse to get out and about in nature this October with our #PicturePefectPetals flower photography competition.

As with any art project, how one views, photographs and edits an image of the same flower will invariably produce remarkably different results and perspectives. We would like to inspire a love and appreciation for flowers and encourage budding amateur photographers to enter our comp. The lucky winner will receive a $250 Flowers for Everyone gift certificate for flower delivery in Sydney (valid for use until 31 December 2014).

To Enter:

1. Take a photo of a flower. Any flower.
2. Go to the Flowers for Everyone Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/FFEAU) and click on the tab ‘Enter our Photography Comp’

Conditions:

1. You can upload as many entries as you like. You can be creative as you like.
2. All entries are to be submitted by 31st October 2014.
3. Winner with the most votes will be notified and announced on Facebook 1st November 2014.

To see what the professionals are doing, take a look at these fine flower photographs and tips from the photographers featured on ePHOTOzine.com For the full article click here.

‘Cool’ by bfgstew

flower_head_cool_stewart

Stewart’s zoom blur flower heads have always stood out in the ePz gallery. He desired to create something much more than just a ‘plain flower shot’. “The method I adopted was purely accidental,” Stewart explains. “I just experimented in Photoshop for a few weeks until I achieved something that was eye catching.

“I had tried using the zoom effect ‘on camera’ but didn’t achieve the same results, my way you can really accentuate the central part of the flower, drawing the viewer in. The blur can and does take away any imperfections with focus and blemishes so all round it’s a win win combination.”

You can learn more about Stewart’s method in a tutorial he wrote for ePz a couple of years ago: Creating zoom blur flower heads

‘Kissing the Pink’ by mikesmith

water_drop_mike_smith

According to ePz, a camera with a great macro facility has been at the forefront of Mike’s production of bold images, helping him to appreciate the colours and detail in flowers.

“When I bought my first digital camera, the first lens I bought was my trusty old Tamron 90mm. I started to sell my work around 5 years ago and made the decision to incorporate black velvet into each image. That way I knew the colour and detail would stand out and make an immediate impression on the viewer,” explains Mike.” I market my work as ‘photographic art for the home’ and I felt that the bold colours would stand out well and make strong statements on any wall.”

“I owe part of my skill set to my fellow ePz members. However, I have also learnt many techniques by experimenting myself. Many set ups can be fairly complex especially when it comes to lighting. The successful set ups often happen after long shoots experimenting with different lighting from different angles until I find the result that I am looking for. Sometimes I know what I want to achieve and others, I just end up liking one of the resulting shots.

The introduction of glycerine (another tip from a fellow ePz member a few years back) to some of my work adds yet another dimension and opens up a whole new avenue of flower photography.”

‘Blue Anemone’ by cattyal

Blue_Anemone

You don’t need a professional studio to create amazing works of art. “Add to good light a sheet of paper for a background and maybe some greaseproof paper for diffusing the light and it’s an easy set up,” explains photographer Alison on ePz.

I also plant my garden very much with flowers for photographing in mind – that way I can just pop out of the back door and grab whatever takes my fancy.”

Nowadays, ePz explains, “Alison has no particular preference towards macro, full flower shots or a huge vase of them – anything goes. Quite simply, Alison likes flowers because they are pretty, they stay put (usually), don’t talk back or fidget and don’t object when being subjected to the occasional cruel treatment i.e. clamps or wire up the stems when they won’t pose naturally (which is actually quite rare).”

“I usually start out just shooting them against plain backgrounds – black velvet and white colormat,” explains Alison. “Once those are done I might rummage amongst my rather large collection of small vases and bottles and see what happens!”

ePz shares Alison’s advice if you want to have a go at photographing flowers using the most basic equipment: •A Good sized window •Some kind of background •A tripod •Clamp for holding flowers •Greaseproof paper for a diffuser

‘Bluebells’ by clintnewsham

bluebells

“Clint first begin playing around with Photoshop back in 2006 after he started using a digital camera,” explains ePz. “As well as using flowers as the focus of his images, Clint also turns them into colourful, out of focus backgrounds”.

The photographers advice? “Pop down to the supermarket and buy the wife a colourful bunch of flowers, wait for her to arrange them nicely in a vase and put them on the window ledge. When she’s not looking, you can move them to a convenient place and use them as a back drop. Shoot at f/2.8 at a distance far enough away from the flowers and you get a nice out of focus background.”

‘Papaver Passion’ by MandyD

flower_closeup

ePz explain that Mandy combined her interest in macro photography with her love for flowers to come up with the perfect photography subject for her to work with.

“As flowers are so diverse in colour, shape and texture they give me a wide range of choice,” explains Mandy. “There’s always something new appearing every day to get excited about.”

“I really like the shallow depth of field associated with macro lens. I usually turn this to my advantage by using large apertures in many of my images to create backgrounds that fall away to a beautiful blur, but for the Poppy shot I used f/22 and went in very close to capture its lovely detail throughout.”

‘Parchment’ by johnjohn01

Parchment

John incorporates textural work in his flower photography to create a unique look all his own.

“The texture work started about the same time as my flower photography when I was shooting some Carnival Glass that used to belong to my grandmother,” explains John. “I didn’t like the background I had used and decided to change it rather than re-shoot. I added a texture layer to the image intending to erase the background and allow the texture to show. Before I erased the background though I played with the layer blending modes and really liked the effect of the texture over the glass. I then tried it on flowers and loved the effect.

Finding the right texture and effect is a matter of trial and error. I’ll play with an image adding various layers of texture and changing the blending mode and opacity until I achieve an image I like. If a texture doesn’t work then I’ll try others.

I still use the technique today although most of my recent work are high key flower portraits with no texture.”

For Full ePHOTOzine article and Photo Credits: http://www.ephotozine.com/article/top-flower-photographers-on-ephotozine-19819

Attention Budding Botanical Artists!

Did you know it can easily take more than 50 hours to complete a relatively small botanical art drawing or painting? That’s intense.

Why bother spending so many hours drawing a rose in such exacting botanical detail when one can use their iphone to take a photo of it (then use cool filters on Instagram to make it look even ‘better’)?

In a society that is all about rapid gratification, focusing our mind’s eye on the small details of a flower stem or single leaf can invoke a zen-like meditative quality.

Furthermore, the sheer intensity of analysing and honouring an object from nature in a drawing of botanical perfection is often said to create a unique ‘bond’ between the artist and their subject.

victorian botanical art    Peony fine art watercolour print     japanese botanical art

Botanical Art v Floral Art

Contemporary botanical art is often described as having a dual focus: science and art.

The ‘challenge’ of botanical art compared to simply ‘floral art’ however, is that it requires a ‘dedication to acquiring knowledge about plant forms and the delicacy of their structure and their life cycles, as well as developing techniques in a variety of media used in the aesthetic representation of this knowledge’. (1)

botanical art - rose    succulent    heliconia

Botanical Art: Getting Started

magnolia by Georg Dionysus Ehret
MAGNOLIA drawing, Georg Dionysus Ehret, 1743. Museum no. D.583-1886. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Formal definitions aside. A careful study of plants is essential in botanical art. The chosen subject has to be accurately sketched with precision so the genus and species are clear, yet also display an appealing composition. Typically the subject is drawn against a blank backdrop, using the likes of graphite, watercolour, coloured pencil, pen and ink.

Keen to have a go? Check out our list of  inspiration and resources below…

Contemporary botanical artists are often influenced by 18th-century masters such as Pierre-Joseph Redoute and Georg Dionysius Ehret.

Pierre Joseph Redoute
Botanical painting by famous Belgian artist Pierre-Joseph Redoute

Books worth referring to for inspiration are:

The Golden Age of Botanical Art by Martyn Rix

The Illustrated Herbal by plant historian Wilfred Blunt, with Sandra Raphael, a study of the development of herbals, their decorative, botanical   and medicinal interest.

The Art of Botanical Painting by Margaret Stevens, published in association with the Society of Botanical Artists.

The Catalogue of Botanical Prints and Drawings from the National Museums of Wales by MH Lazarus, includes works by Ehret and Redouté.

References:

http://mnborealart.com/Trees/Botanical_Art_History.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/plants/9924556/Why-botanical-art-is-still-blooming-today.html

Photo Credits: http://www.pinterest.com/ffeaus/beautiful-botanical-art/

Spring Floral Collection 2014

Spring has well and truly arrived in flowers (if not with the weather!) and our Budburst Fresh Spring Floral Collection has officially launched online and in-store.

Featuring year-round favourites such as lilies, gerbera daisies, roses and orchids, combined with springtime classics including perfumed stock, tulips, ranunculus and native blushing brides, our spring floral collection is bellissimo!

And with a variety of price points ranging from $55 to $110, we are confident there is a floral design to suit everyone’s tastes and budget….check out our new blooms below.

BOUQUETS AND ARRANGEMENTS $55 – $70

Spring Cream Sympathy Flower Arrangement gerbera-bouquet

BOUQUETS AND ARRANGEMENTS $70 – $85

La Vie en Rose     Queen Anne's Lace and Orchids

South of Provence Bouquet     Mixed colour rose bouquet

BOUQUETS AND ARRANGEMENTS $85 – $99

A Good Vintage Flower Arrangement     native to spring flower arrangement

the harvester hamper fruit and wine      the harvester hamper fruit and wine

BOUQUETS, PLANTS AND ARRANGEMENTS $100 – $110

phalaenopsis orchid plant gift   phalaenopsis orchid plant

spring flower arrangement    spring flower arrangement in vase

A Spring Symphony Bouquet     spring symphony of flowers

flowers for everyone app logoAs late spring bloomers and flushes of flowers from local farms arrive into our studios, we’ll be adding them to our seasonal spring collection and Sydney Specials  page. Keep an eye out for sweet posies and bouquets of beautiful daffodils, sweet peas, freesia, jonquils and blossom!

Have you downloaded the Flowers for Everyone app on iTunes? Order your flowers anytime, anywhere on your mobile or tablet with our flowers app!

It’s Budburst! Win Tickets to Jazz in the Vines

Hoorah! The countdown to spring is over and our Budburst Fresh Spring Floral Collection has officially launched! To celebrate the arrival of spring and a gooooorgeous new range of blooms, we are giving away TWO x TWO tickets valued at $155 each to the Hunter Valley Jazz in the Vines ‘Al Fresco Jazz Club’. Ooooooh la!

Because let’s face it – flowers, wine and jazz are a pretty awesome combination. See below for entry details…

spring floral collectionJazz in the Vines Hunter Valley  A Good Vintage Flower Arrangement

TO ENTER

Simply purchase flowers from our Spring collection during September, and type in the code word “FFEBUDBURST” into the SPECIAL DELIVERY INSTRUCTIONS box when placing your order online (alternatively you can fill in an entry form in-store).

Entries close 30/9/14 and the winners will be notified and announced on Facebook on 1/10/14.

Jazz in the Vines

 THE NEW LOOK JAZZ IN THE VINES 2014

Saturday October 25th from 11am to 6pmjazz in the vines
Tyrrell’s Vineyard Pokolbin

Jazz in the Vines is the longest running festival in the Hunter Valley now in its 22nd year.

On Saturday October 25th, fans of all ages will descend on Pokolbin for one of the biggest days on the Hunter’s social calendar. It’s about Music, Food, Wine and Dance, it’s Australia’s biggest mosh pit with over six hectares of freedom to enjoy a spectacular day in the fresh air and sunshine.

This year’s musical line-up is stunning – it includes James Morrison’s Big Band featuring special guest Leo Sayer, Lisa Hunt, Joe Camilleri and the Black Sorrows, Emma Pask, Galapagos Duck, the Australian Army Big Band and The Rehab Brass Band.

Our giveaway tickets to the Al Fresco Jazz Club offer a marqueed area off to one side of the ground. The Alfresco Jazz Club is your private haven, an area to sit, relax and enjoy all of the sights, sounds and tastes that Jazz in the Vines has to offer. Alfresco Jazz Club tickets consist of entry to Jazz in the Vines, reserved seating in the Jazz Club (tables of max 9, you may be sitting with new people, what a great way to meet new friends), a private fenced area, marquee, tables, chairs, and toilets.

Wine will be available for purchase within the Jazz Club area and you can pre-book a lunch Hamper for two and pick up on the day.  You are also welcome to purchase food and drinks from any of the other restaurants and wineries on-site.

Please note that the Alfresco Jazz Club is not an “A Reserve” section, but merely a more comfortable and convenient way to experience Jazz in the Vines.

If you aren’t lucky enough to win tickets then you can purchase from the official festival site jazzinthevines.com.au . Just bring a picnic and some friends, sit back and relax or party hard, the choice is yours.  The Hunter Valley’s longest running annual party….. it’s your best day out!

To view our new Budburst Fresh Spring Floral Collection and be in with a chance to win, click here.

The Pothole Project: Creating Teeny, Tiny Gardens

Flicking through the Sunday papers over brunch last weekend, this picture of a miniature garden caught my attention….

The Pothole Gardener

Gaining exposure on the cover of this season’s Australian Garden History Magazine, the Pothole Gardener project is ‘all about creating unexpected moments of happiness’.

katyu8

Founder Steve Wheen expresses on his Pothole Gardener blog, “My little gardens are a respite from the greyness of London. People read all sorts of things into my gardens when they try and rationalise them – something I’m fascinated with…”

ianac-pothole-gardener-13

“I don’t generally garden on the road, only on the footpaths (I’m not completely mad) and apart from keeping safe, the only rule of pothole gardening is I don’t ever use figures in my gardens. I use a lot of miniatures as part of the project, and as a big part of my work is inspiring peoples imaginations and I find leaving scenes helps provoke the audience”.

pothole gardener     pothole gardener

An-Ode-to-my-stolen-bike-by-Steve-WheenThe-Pothole-Gardener

For Steve, pothole gardening is all about “getting out there and getting your hands dirty” and his happy little pothole garden inspirations have struck a chord with many others. Steve regularly receives pics of wonderful gardens from around the world that he posts to his blog. Some have even made it into his book “The Little Book of Little Gardens”.

pothole gardener

CREATE YOUR OWN POTHOLE GARDENS

Get behind this fantastic feel good project and create a pothole garden of your own. Upload an image to Instagram tagging @potholegardener and @flowersforeveryoneaustralia –  we’ll further spread our favourite tags on the Flowers for Everyone Facebook page for even more people to feel the love!

References and Photo Credits: http://thepotholegardener.com/

The Naughty Narcissus

Narcissus flowers provide the perfume world’s most ‘naughty notes’.

Described as sultry, rich, and earthy, its fragrance is almost a little sharp, with a ‘green’ animalic scent and traces of hyacinth and jasmine. A bit naughty smelling, the narcissus / daffodil  is worn by those not afraid to wear a perfume that makes a statement. (1)

cluster of jonquilsperfume

The essential oil is predominately produced in the Grasse region of France and the Netherlands (2), and used mainly in high end perfumes, such as Dior’s Eau de Toilette Miss Dior, Tom Ford’s Jonquil de Nuit, Molinard de Molinard, Guerlain Vol de Nuit, Armani Armani, Lancôme’s Climate de Collection, and Hermes Amazon.

It takes 500 kilograms of flowers to produce 300 grams of ‘absolute’, making it an expensive oil! (2)

white daffodil   candle

The use of narcissus in perfume isn’t a modern day haute couture occurrence.

The narcissus was used in ancient Rome for the creation of a fragrance called Naricssinum. Arabs used it in their perfumery, as well as to cure baldness. In India, narcissus oil is applied to body before prayer. It was used in cosmetics as an additive to powders, soaps and lipsticks. (2)

jonquil farm   white jonquil

The name narcissus itself was probably derived from the Greek word ‘narke’ and later adopted by Romans as ‘narce’, meaning ‘to be numb’, referring to the narcotic effects of narcissus, which can sometimes be overwhelming. A bit like when one wears too much perfume! (2)

narcissus

About Narcissus Flowers…

The cultivated narcissus come in three different varieties.

The Daffodil: Featuring four to six flattened, grass-like leaves and a flower stalk bearing asingle flower with a long, trumpet like ‘corona’.

The Jonquil: Featuring two to four narrow, cylindrical, rush-like leaves and a flower stalk bearing two to six relatively small flowers with short ‘coronas’.

The Narcissus: Similar to daffodils, but its flattened flower stalk bears four to eight flowers with short ‘coronas’.

lamb   narcissus flower   erlicheer jonquil

Reference

1. http://theperfumedcourt.com/Products/Narcissus—Modern-Sampler-of-the-daring-perfume—featuring-this-naughty-flower—18-samples__NARCISSUSMODERN.aspx

2 http://www.fragrantica.com/notes/Narcissus-18.html