Hydrangeas on Manly’s Shelly Beach

Flowers for Everyone recently held a ‘Battle of the Florists’ among two of its retail stores. Our Balgowlah team had a beach theme with the design condition of incorporating ornamental kale.

The girls went all out, photographing their stunning floral arrangement on Manly’s Shelly Beach. Plenty of passers by stopped to comment on how gorgeous it was, but one of our Facebook fans took it a step further, and, after seeing the photo on our page, painted the most amazing still life of the flowers.

Hydrangeas on Shelly Beach
Hydrangeas on Shelly Beach by Terri Maddock, acrylic and pastel on matboard, 25 x 35cm.
Battle of the Florists
The original photo taken on Manly’s Shelly Beach, featuring ornamental kale, hydrangea, Scottish thistle, Eucalyptus foliage and monsteria leaves.

Curiousity piqued, we checked out Terri’s portfolio listed on Redbubble and were wowed. An accountant by day, Terri’s humble confession to art and textiles being a ‘sideline’ is understating her talent.

About Terri

How long have you been painting for?

I studied art at high school & part-time evening at TAFE (over 30 years ago, how embarrassing!). I started again 9 years ago after children etc & have really enjoyed being able to focus on painting again – mostly with pastels & oils.

How did you learn how to paint? 

I started back at art learning pastel painting with Bernard Devaux at Forestville Community Art Centre.  Bernard is a wonderful artist & our group at Forestville was great.  Since moving to Bonny Hills on the Mid north coast in December 2013, I’ve been painting with the Hastings Valley Fine Art Assoc & enjoy plain air (outdoors) painting on a Monday morning the most. We have a gallery in Port Macquarie overlooking Oxley Beach where I exhibit.

What is your favourite flower?

Roses are my favourite flower – doesn’t matter what colour, although I do like the old fashioned roses that have a beautiful perfume the best.

How can people buy your art? 

My original artworks are available from my home studio in Bonny Hills, as well as the Hastings Fine Art Gallery in Port Macquarie. Redbubble has a portfolio of paintings that are available as prints & other merchandise, with the descriptions indicating if the original has been sold.

Terri can be contacted via email at bonnyviewstudio@gmail.com if you are interested in her work.

We are so glad Terri spotted our photograph on Facebook and took inspiration from it to produce such a gorgeous painting. Thanks Terri for sharing!

Keep an eye out on our Facebook page for the next #battleoftheflorists competition announcement and the chance to win a $50 gift certificate with Flowers for Everyone!

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The Floral Works of Artist Sarah Gabriel

As florists we draw inspiration for floral design from many sources, art being one of them. Australian artist Sarah Gabriel’s drawings capture the ‘energy’ and ‘spirit’ of her environment in the country, through her distinctive line work and use of pigmented inks.

Sarah’s original works on paper are created from her regionally based working studio in Lauriston, Central Victoria and are distributed to nominated galleries, both interstate and overseas. Sarah prints and hand colours limited edition drypoint etchings and opens her studio for small group workshops in drawing and printmaking.

Here is a glimpse of some of her fabulous works on paper….

Win a Sarah Gabriel-inspired floral arrangement from Flowers for Everyone!

sarah gabrial

TO ENTER

Scroll right down to the very bottom of this article where there is a ‘Comments’ box under ‘Leave a Reply’. Type in the name of your favourite flower into the comments box and press the submit button.

Please note this prize is only for delivery in the Sydney metro. Winner will be notified and the prize draw announced on Friday 22 January 2016 via social media.

Sarah Gabriel’s gallery and shop, can be found on Piper Street in Kyneton, Victoria, just over one hour’s drive north east of Melbourne. She also runs small group workshops throughout the year from her private studio. More information about Sarah can be found here.

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see nature all ridicule and deformity, and some scarcely see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.” – William Blake

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Win a $250 Flowers Gift Voucher

Unleash your inner florist for a chance to win a $250 flowers gift voucher to purchase and/or deliver flowers anywhere in the Sydney metro.

Simply style your own bud vase with flowers and take a pic. Then either upload via the competition link below or follow us on Instagram and upload using the hashtag #innerfloristcomp

The picture with the most amount of votes will win!

For further details on how to enter and vote go to http://bit.ly/innerflorist. Entries close 8th January 2015!

TIPS ON STYLING BUD VASES

A bud vase you say? What is a bud vase exactly? A bud vase has a small, narrow opening to fit one to three single flowers or foliage stems (or a miniature posy). The opening is usually no more than 5cm wide, thus restricting the amount of flower stems that will fit, and also enabling the single stem to be well supported.

Win a $250 flowers gift voucher just for putting a flower stem in a vase you say?

Yep, that’s correct. It may sound like a no-brainer, but the beauty of a bud vase and the thought that goes into styling it for a photo does take skill. Take a look at the work of Japanese Ikebana master Toshiro Kawase and you will see what we mean.

Toshiro Kawase Ikebana
Perfection in a single stem and a bud vase by Toshiro Kawase

The Vase is as Important as the Flowers

Get creative with your bud vase. Scout op shops and garage sales or rummage through nanna’s kitchen cupboard. Use this as the basis of your design, then select your flower stem and/or foliage from there.

Getting the Photo Just Right

You may have a lovely bud vase arrangement but your picture lets you down. Instagram offers lots of lighting/colour effects but you still need to get the background and composition just right. Take a look at these examples below – whether you opt for a plain background or a scene set up with ‘props’ to create an overall look is up to you!

bud vase

bud vase

bud vase

bud vase

bud vase

So unleash your inner florist and get arranging and instagram-ing folks! Happy creating.

From the Flowers for Everyone Team

#innerfloristcomp

http://bit.ly/innerflorist 

*Remember – the prize is valid for flowers purchased and/or delivered in the Sydney metro only and to be redeemed within 12 months. Entries and voting end 8th January. Winner announced on Facebook and Instagram on 9th January.

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Attention Budding Botanical Artists!

Did you know it can easily take more than 50 hours to complete a relatively small botanical art drawing or painting? That’s intense.

Why bother spending so many hours drawing a rose in such exacting botanical detail when one can use their iphone to take a photo of it (then use cool filters on Instagram to make it look even ‘better’)?

In a society that is all about rapid gratification, focusing our mind’s eye on the small details of a flower stem or single leaf can invoke a zen-like meditative quality.

Furthermore, the sheer intensity of analysing and honouring an object from nature in a drawing of botanical perfection is often said to create a unique ‘bond’ between the artist and their subject.

victorian botanical art    Peony fine art watercolour print     japanese botanical art

Botanical Art v Floral Art

Contemporary botanical art is often described as having a dual focus: science and art.

The ‘challenge’ of botanical art compared to simply ‘floral art’ however, is that it requires a ‘dedication to acquiring knowledge about plant forms and the delicacy of their structure and their life cycles, as well as developing techniques in a variety of media used in the aesthetic representation of this knowledge’. (1)

botanical art - rose    succulent    heliconia

Botanical Art: Getting Started

magnolia by Georg Dionysus Ehret
MAGNOLIA drawing, Georg Dionysus Ehret, 1743. Museum no. D.583-1886. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Formal definitions aside. A careful study of plants is essential in botanical art. The chosen subject has to be accurately sketched with precision so the genus and species are clear, yet also display an appealing composition. Typically the subject is drawn against a blank backdrop, using the likes of graphite, watercolour, coloured pencil, pen and ink.

Keen to have a go? Check out our list of  inspiration and resources below…

Contemporary botanical artists are often influenced by 18th-century masters such as Pierre-Joseph Redoute and Georg Dionysius Ehret.

Pierre Joseph Redoute
Botanical painting by famous Belgian artist Pierre-Joseph Redoute

Books worth referring to for inspiration are:

The Golden Age of Botanical Art by Martyn Rix

The Illustrated Herbal by plant historian Wilfred Blunt, with Sandra Raphael, a study of the development of herbals, their decorative, botanical   and medicinal interest.

The Art of Botanical Painting by Margaret Stevens, published in association with the Society of Botanical Artists.

The Catalogue of Botanical Prints and Drawings from the National Museums of Wales by MH Lazarus, includes works by Ehret and Redouté.

References:

http://mnborealart.com/Trees/Botanical_Art_History.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/plants/9924556/Why-botanical-art-is-still-blooming-today.html

Photo Credits: http://www.pinterest.com/ffeaus/beautiful-botanical-art/